2013-07-18 13:47:40

Democracy Now! 2013-07-18 Thursday

As Congress holds its second major public hearing on the National Security Agency’s bulk spying, we speak with Glenn Greenwald, the Guardian journalist who first published whistleblower Edward Snowden’s revelations. The NSA admitted their analysis of phone records and online behavior far exceeded what it had previously disclosed. "The fact that you now see members of both political parties increasingly angry over the fact that they were misled and lied to by top-level Obama administration officials, that the laws that they enacted in the wake of 9/11 — as broad as they were — are being incredibly distorted by secret legal interpretations approved by secret courts, really indicates exactly that Snowden’s motives to come forward with these revelations, at the expense of his liberty and even his life, were valid and compelling," Greenwald says. "If you think about whistleblowing in terms of people who expose things the government is hiding that they shouldn’t be, in order to bring about reform, I think what you’re seeing is the fruits of classic whistleblowing."

As the world marks the 95th birthday of Nelson Mandela, South Africa’s first black president and a beloved symbol of the country’s struggle to end apartheid, longtime South African activist Trevor Ngwane takes Democracy Now! on a tour of the township of Soweto. Speaking outside of Mandela’s former home, Ngwane recalls when the ANC leader was first captured, leading to a 27-year imprisonment before his release in 1990. Ngwane was active in the struggle against apartheid that culminated in Mandela’s 1994 election and today remains a leading South African voice for human rights.

As post-apartheid South Africa struggles to fulfill its promise, the new documentary "I Live to Sing" follows three gifted singers at the University of Cape Town’s opera school, which was once off limits to black students. "For many years, opera was viewed in South Africa and elsewhere as a completely European, elitist, white art — both by whites who felt that blacks weren’t going have what it took to sing opera, but also more recently, by the black government in South Africa," says director Julie Cohen. The film premieres tonight on PBS Thirteen in New York City, and will be available to watch online.

Edward Snowden Glenn Greenwald National Security Agency (NSA) Nelson Mandela South Africa

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