2018-01-02 15:30:59

Concerns Raised About $1 Billion Facial Scan Program with High Error Rate at Nine U.S. Airports`

This month, Senators Mike Lee, a Republican, and Edward Markey, a Democrat, called for a halt to the expansion of a $1 billion airport facial scanning program that the Department of Homeland Security uses to identify travelers on some flights that depart from nine U.S. airports: Boston, Las Vegas, Miami, New York’s John F. Kennedy, Washington Dulles, both Houston airports, Chicago O‘Hare and Atlanta. Congress has approved the program for use on non-U.S. citizens but never expressly authorized its use on Americans. The senators also asked DHS to provide data about the accuracy of the scans and cited a study by the Center on Privacy and Technology that said the technology had high error rates and was subject to bias, because the scans often fail to properly identify women and African Americans. DN! speaks with Ron Nixon, homeland security correspondent for The New York Times.

Airport Security Department of Homeland Security Edward Markey Mike Lee New York Times Ron Nixon

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